Kemano T2 Project

Kemano T2 Project

Project Overview

The BC Work's smelter in Kitimat is powered by the Kemano Powerhouse, which receives water from the Nechako Reservoir via a single tunnel that is over 60 years old.

Completion of a second tunnel will ensure the long-term reliability of the power supply from the Kemano Powerhouse, which powers Rio Tinto's BC Works smelter in Kitimat.

In December 2017, the Kemano Second Tunnel Project (T2 Project) received final approval from Rio Tinto's Board.

Rio Tinto will continue to operate the existing tunnel and monitor its condition until the T2 Project is completed, and on an ongoing basis.

Project completion is expected by the end of 2020.

 

Kemano T2 Project facts Kemano T2 Project facts
An overview of the Kemano T2 Project

Contracting and employment opportunities

Frontier Kemper Aecon (FKA) has been selected to deliver the majority of the construction scope. As main contractor, FKA is responsible for hiring and managing the various subcontractors and employees who will be required to construct the project. Rio Tinto is working with Frontier Kemper Aecon to ensure the maximum involvement of First Nations, and local and regional businesses and workforce in the project, subject to qualifications and availability.

At peak construction, the total construction workforce could be in the range of 300, however this number will vary and will depend on the final workforce plan. All workforce requirements will be arranged through the main contractor and through the Project Labour Agreement with the unions working on the project.

If you are interested in learning more about contracting and employment opportunities, please connect with our main contractor.

Tunnel Boring Machine – "tl'ughus"

A large component of the project involves complete a second tunnel by Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). TBM construction is anticipated to commence in late 2018.

The TBM that will be used is being transported to Canada from Germany. Once in Vancouver it will be broken down into pieces and shipped by barge to Kemano where it will be reassembled The TBM that will be used is being transported to Canada from Germany. Once in Vancouver it will be broken down into pieces and shipped by barge to Kemano where it will be reassembled
The TBM that will be used is being transported to Canada from Germany. Once in Vancouver it will be broken down into pieces and shipped by barge to Kemano where it will be reassembled

In preparing for the project, Rio Tinto worked with the Cheslatta Carrier Nation and the Haisla Nation to assist in designing the cutterhead for the TBM and providing it with a name that reflects their cultures and beliefs.

The cutterhead was designed by a grade-six student from the Haisla Community School, Ali-Anna, and the Cheslatta Nation named the TBM. The name chosen is "tl'ughus", which comes from the legendary monster snake that traveled from lake to lake by boring through the mountains allowing fish to pass from lakes on one side of the mountain to lakes on the other side. Variations of the legend of "tl'ughus" are shared with Carrier communities across the region. The Haisla Nation also share a similar belief.

Rio Tinto, and all the men and women that will help build the Kemano T2 Project, shall respect this belief as we work alongside the legendary "tl'ughus".